IN WHICH WE BUY EMBROIDERIES–PART IV

I’m not done yet!

Here’s another piece we found on our Delhi/Agra trip.  This came from a dealer in Agra, and not the fair trade market in Delhi.

BlackHanging-2

This is a patchwork wall hanging.  It’s sort of in Crazy Quilt style, although the piece is one huge block, roughly 4 feet x 2 feet.  It’s made up of fragments of highly embellished antique textiles, much of it overdyed in black; plus some newer pieces to eke things out.  The fragments are appliqued to totally cover a background, and that ground cloth is in turn backed by another heavier cotton cloth.  There is minimal quilting between the layers to hold them together – mostly some tacking stitches along the rolled borders between the fragments.

Close up you can see the amount of beadwork, sequins, gold stitching and other encrustations:

BlackHanging-1

The dealer had several like this.  Believe it or not – this was the plainest.  It was also the one in best condition.  One problem with antique pieces is that often the cloth is not stable.  Silk is friable, and crackles with age.  All the more so when it has been overdyed.  Threads securing hand-hammered sequins or rough edged metal beads can break easily.  I looked long and hard at the five offerings, and picked the one in the best shape from a curator’s perspective.

The number of techniques in this piece is hard to estimate.  There’s tambour in silk, cotton and metal threads; beadwork and sequins applied in myriad ways; satin stitch, laid couching of various types; buttonhole stitch; something very much like or nuée, with gold threads affixed with colored silks in patterns or to create shaded effects; appliqued lace; some very old mirror work (shisha); and heaven knows what else. 

The way this piece is put together reminds me a lot of a cherished gift at home.  Jackie of the late and lamented Wild & Woolly, gave me this knitting bag for services rendered when I helped her with a major home reorganization:

bag-2

It’s also of Indian origin, assembled patchwork style from small pieces of sari borders and other embroidered snippets.  In this case the backing fabric is cotton velour, instead of heavy flat-woven matte-finish cotton.  I have a feeling that this bag is somehow related to the black hanging, if only distantly.

But as jaw-dropping as the black piece is, it’s not our ultimate acquisition (so far).  You’ll have to wait until the next post to see that!

2 responses

  1. It may be old and it may have an amazing number of techniques, but I think it is ugly. There is nothing attractive by the way the pieces are joined. There is no place for the eye to land and well it’s ugly. It’s good to remember that just because it is old or done by another culture, does not make it attractive, interesting maybe, but attractive no.

    1. I have to admit that I can’t argue with you. This is an interesting piece, but not one where the whole is more than a sum of its parts. But the parts are pretty cool.

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