IN WHICH WE BUY EMBROIDERIES–PART V

It occurs to me that before I can begin writing about our holiday week London trip, complete with meet-up with Elder Daughter, plus all sorts of interesting sights at various museums, historical places, and theater performances, I have to finish my posts about our November trip to Agra and Delhi.  Apologies for the delay, I plead computer woes, spotty connectivity, and ennui (in no particular order).

Here’s the prize piece from our big India trip – a tamboured Pashmina jacket, made in Kashmir, but purchased in Agra.

jacket-1 jacket-2

It is one of the nicest, most finely worked tambour items I’ve handled.  The colors in these shots are pretty true, but they glow a bit more in person.  The golds, oranges, reds, and browns twinkle against the cobalt blue ground.  The edging isn’t trim – it’s more densely packed tambour work, done on the same piece of cloth as the scrolling vines of the main body.  The buttons are cloth, covered with more stitching. The thread is all Pashmina wool, too.  No metallics or glitter. You can see the surface sheen from the fine, densely packed chain stitches in the button placket. 

I will say that this was an indulgent gift from The Resident Male – the price made me giddy, even after he bargained it down from the stratosphere.  But for work of this quality, the price was fair. I adore my luxury present, and am looking forward to wearing it in cooler climates.

I am still looking for other good examples of Indian needlework, more within my budget.  Sadly, as with so many handcrafts, bad drives out good.  Since most of the tourist market does not recognize or reward quality craftsmanship, artisans pursue greater revenue and higher volume over better artifacts. 

Pieces that show skill and solid artisanry are few and far between, but  I’ve seen endless piles of poorly stitched shisha (mirror) work cushions, sloppy satin stitch hangings that look like they were done in one evening, and beadwork that sheds its sequins after a light shake.  I can’t fault the makers – they are pressed to provide income for their families.  But I won’t buy those things, either.  So the hunt continues…

One response

  1. That jacket it gorgeous, whatever the price. Some things just have to be bought – I hope the maker or makers received a fair share.

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