THIRD TIME IS THE CHARM

I’m still plugging away on the Mixed Wave pattern scarf for Elder Daughter:  It’s based on a cowl pattern of the same name.

Russet-scarf-2

Now, why has it taken me two full rip-back and start again cycles on this one?  Mostly because I can’t resisting tweaking here and there when I work from a pattern.

In this case, the recipient and I decided that a narrower piece was more desirable for wear with the target coat.  So I removed a ten-stitch unit.  Then we jointly decided that instead of two contrasting colors, we wanted to use three, in combo with our neutral color (black).  It’s hard to see here, but I’ve got a cranberry red, a maroon, and a variegated that ranges from cranberry through maroon, with shots of turmeric here and there. After that it was the traditional matter of Not Paying Attention, forgetting to move counting markers, and getting incredibly tangled from all of the flipping as the short row segments (the almond shapes) are formed*.  And let’s not forget the last forgetting – neglecting to make sure that stitch count was stable after every left and right edge segment pair.

But I’ve got it well in hand now.  I’m even beginning to remember to alternate left and right leaning almonds, along with choosing which segment to work as an almond, cycling through the colors, and remembering to work the row-beginning decreases and row-ending increases that give the piece its rhomboid slant.

I will continue on this piece, making it a bit longer than the original, and eventually either graft it into a true infinity scarf, or finish it off as a straight scarf with pointed ends.  We’ll see how my well my composure handles the all-too-frequent stopping to untangle.

 

*  Yes, I know the trick of always flipping clockwise on front side and counter-clockwise on wrong side rows of the short row sequence.  It isn’t helping.

One response

  1. Had a good chuckle over this one. I can’t tell you how many times I have found a mistake, 6 inches down, and ripped something out and redid it. It’s how I learned to knit. Good for you. This is so lovely.

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