Category Archives: Chanterelle Scarf

CHANTERELLE – EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW AGAIN

UPDATE:  THE DOWNLOADABLE PDF PATTERN FOR CHANTERELLE HAS BEEN ADDED TO MY KNITTING PATTERNS PAGE, AT THE TAB ABOVE.

A bit more mindless knitting this week past.  I have two balls of Zauberball Crazy, a wildly variegated (and expensive) fingering weight yarn.  Both balls had minor damages to them, and I wanted to work them up quickly.  But I didn’t want to make socks.  This stuff’s colors are so over the top that I wanted to make something that would be seen.  Scarves are ideal.  I’ve done several before using Wingspan and its variants, or other designs calculated to display the gradients to their best effect.  But I wanted to do something different.  I cast on for a couple of designs I found on Ravelry, but wasn’t particularly pleased.

What to do….

Ah.  Thinking back, my most popular pattern of all time is Kureopatora’s Snake.  That was written for a DK weight variegated, and was the result of happy experiment.  It’s basically Entrelac, but slimmed down to just the two edge triangles, and worked over a large number of stitches.  The result is a graceful interlock of trumpet shapes, with the trumpet’s spread accentuated by working a purl into (not just slipping) the K2tog join stitch at the end of each partial row before the turn.

Why not make that one up in fingering weight, and publish the pattern adaptations that make it work?

So I present the first of the two test pieces.  I’ll be starting the second tonight:

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First off, I’ve renamed the thing. Now that it’s independent of the original yarn, I re-dub this one “Chanterelle.”  Yes, there are ends (the initial cast-on, bind off, plus a couple of damages).  A personal quirk – I don’t darn in the ends until I am ready to give my knit gift to the recipient.  This will sit un-darned until then.

I will be writing up the full design again under the new name, but for now, start with the Kureopatora’s Snake pattern, available for free at the Knitting Patterns tab at the top of this page.

CHANTERELLE:
A FINGERING-WEIGHT VARIATION OF KUREOPATORA’S SNAKE

Grab your ball of fingering weight variegated yarn.  ONE ball of Zauberball Crazy made this scarf, with only about 3 yards of yarn left over.  It’s about 5 inches wide (a bit under 8 cm), and 66 inches long (a bit under 168 cm).  Gauge is pretty much unimportant.  I recommend a MUCH looser gauge than one would use for socks.  I used a US #5 needle (3.5mm) for this project.

Follow the Kureopatora pattern as written for the initial section, but instead of stopping when you have 30 stitches on the needle, keep going until you have 46.

Work the entire scarf as-written, until you have completed ten full trumpet sections (not counting the partial trumpet done to initiate the project).

Follow the directions for the final finishing section, EXCEPT that instead of working the final section as normal until there are 15 stitches on each needle, keep going until you have 23 stitches on each needle.  Then on every row that begins on the edge of the scarf after that, work a SSK instead of the increase you have been doing throughout the prior sections.

DO NOT STRETCH-BLOCK this piece.  If you feel it’s lumpy, moisten it and pat it flat, but do not use wires or pins to stretch it out.  You want to preserve those graceful curves.

SCREAMING TO ANOTHER FINISH

And here’s another finish!

This was a super quick project, barely a week from cast-on to final block.  Even though I still have a couple of ends to tuck in, I consider it done.

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Younger Daughter bespoke this, having noted the popularity of screaming yellow this Fall season, and a similar trend towards heavier, highly textured knits.

This shoulder/mini shawl is done in machine washable Merino sport weight, from Gems.  I used the May Day Shawl pattern by Zabeth Loisel-Weiner, available for free on Ravelry.  It took about 2.3 skeins of the yellow.  I consider it a very simple project – the instructions and charts were spot on, and very clear.  Lots of “bang-for-the-buck” here in terms of visual complexity vs. effort invested.  If you are looking for a first serious lacy knitting project, this is not a bad place to start.

That being said, I have to say I detest knitting bobbles and nupps.  These are bobbles.  I tamed them somewhat by knitting backwards – that is learning to work the back-again bit of each bobble working off of my right hand needle, so I didn’t have to flip the work over to purl back in the middle of each little bump.  If you haven’t tried this yet, it’s well worth the learning curve investment for little back-and-forth scraps like bobbles and Entrelac.

A quick word on blocking if I may.  Lacy knitting needs to be blocked to within an inch of its life – as tightly as you can.  Here’s the before photo, and the mid-block photo:

 

If you count the 2×2-inch squares of the checked sheet I block on, you can see that pinned out (right), the thing is almost twice as big as it was before pinning (left).

How do I block?  I admit I’m not the most precise or assiduous, but I do try, at least a bit to keep things neat and square.  The black and white sheet, although an eye-popping Peter Max background is very helpful in estimating and meeting target measurements, and keeping 90-degree angles true.   I bought it at a discount/close-out store years ago when shopping for inexpensive bedding for the girls to take to summer camp.  I knew that if the sheets survived, they would be perfect for this use.  (Plaids, Tattersall checks, and ginghams would also work).

I dampened the knitting, and spread my sheet over an area rug to provide anchorage for my pins.  Then I threaded blocking wires across the top of the piece, slipping them into every edge “purl bump.”  Then I inserted additional wires along the join line between the edging and the center triangle.  I pinned the top wire down first, spreading the work along its length, then stretched the piece down the spine, pinning the pointed junction of the two side wires.  Then I pinned the side wires out as far as I could manage, making sure to keep the angles (as measures vs. the checks) true.  I had to jockey and adjust them a few times, but eventually I was satisfied.  Then and only then did I place a single pin at each of the edging’s points.  If I had started with the edging points, the center triangle would have been deformed.  Using the wires keep the piece from developing internal “scallops” corresponding to the pins placed in the edging.

No lie – it is tedious.  But it’s worth it.

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Now on to other things.

I say goodbye to this tiny little embroidered scrap.  It’s the finest gauge I ever worked – over 38 stitches per inch on 80-ish or so count muslin, using standard black sewing thread:

 

It started out as an experiment, to see if I could do a coif at that gauge.  Soon after I got started it met with an accident, and was never finished.  That was about 35 years ago, easily.  Why goodbye?  I’ve mailed it off to become part of A Larger Project.  The East Kingdom doll project was on display at the 50th anniversary, and still lives.  About the only thing people remember me for is that I embroidered, so I am sending this snippet to the curators/creators to be a prop for the doll that represents me.  Maybe they’ll make a tiny flat frame for it.  That would be sweet.  Pix if I get some, I promise.

And finally, another start.  I have two balls of precious multi-color yarn – rather pricey Schoppel Zauberball Crazy fingering weight.  I adore just looking at them.  But it was time to put at least one to good use.  So I began casting around for something fun to do with the very long repeat.  I’ve tried a lot of the popular projects that use Zauberball.  And I didn’t feel like working on some of the others.  But then I remembered that I HAD a design of my own.  I did up Kureopatora’s Snake in that yarn – a DK weight variegated with a long repeat.  It has always been the most popular original pattern on any of my websites.  So why not try it with a smaller gauge yarn and explore the possibilities?

Here I am.  Following the pattern as written, with three exceptions:

  1. Using the Zauberball Crazy fingering weight instead of the Noro Kureopatora DK.
  2. Using size 5 US (3.75mm) instead of 6 US (4.0mm) to make the thing more airy
  3. Working across 40 stitches instead of the 30 specified.

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You can see that both the color progression and shaping are beginning to present themselves.  I think that if I had a chance to rename this now established pattern, I’d call it Chanterelle, instead.  More on this one as it grows…