Tag Archives: modular knitting

FLAG WAVING

I didn’t expect this.  I’ve finished the Chanterelle knit from the Schoeller and Stahl’s Fortisimma Socka Color, # 1776, “Stars and Stripes.”  In the ball it looked like it would present as medium width stripes, narrower than the ones in the ocean-wave blue sample scarf, but not particularly special in any way.  In my standard  socks, I would guess that each stripe would be about three or four rounds, with the blue areas about four or five rounds.

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BUT

In the directional world of this pattern, look what happened!

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In a serendipity I seldom achieve, the directionality of the Chanterelle pattern, coupled with the narrow width sections make a flags-in-the breeze effect.  And see that little butterfly at the right, containing about 18 inches of yarn?  That’s ALL I had left.  A squeaker, for sure.

Although I can’t bring myself to sport this, I have the perfect family to give this to – friends with a son in international competitions.  It will be the perfect thing for them to wear as they cheer him on.

Now on to yet another.  My goal is to show off a wide variety of self-stripers and variegateds, so folks can gauge what their own yarn might look like.  Digging down into the stash, I come up with another Nancy-Gift Yarn (it was a very generous gift).  This is Steinbach Wolle Aktiv Effect sock yarn, and as you can see from the 100g skein promises to have narrow stripes – probably manifesting as only two rounds each in a standard sock.

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As always, you can find the Chanterelle pattern for free at the Knitting Patterns tab at the top of this page.

And in other news, because there can always be other news, I’ve been asked to do a quickie set of fingerless mittens, from the leftover screaming yellow shawl yarn.  I’ll be casting on for that over the weekend.

 

 

BABY BLANKET BINGO

Finished.

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We’ve got columns up and down, and rows across. Bingo!

A simple double-eyelet lace pattern from the first Duchrow book.  Knitting on modular-style using the pull-loop method I learned doing the Forest Path entrelac stole.  The same large-eyelet edging I invented to use with my Motley scrap yarn blanket.  And a measly 10 evenings of knitting time, using US #10 needles and 5 skeins of worsted weight Plymouth Encore Colorspun.  A lightning project if ever there was one.

SECOND HELPING OF TRIFLES

Two progress status reports today!

First is the Trifles sampler, in progress as a dorm gift to Younger Daughter, who will need such a thing in a year or so. (I have given myself lots of time for completion). As you can see, the motto is finished, using four different alphabets from Ramzi’s Sajou collection. I’ve played with them somewhat, working in the gold color accents, which are not marked as a secondary color on the charts.

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I have also stitched in two small Daleks, to comply with her request, stitched in gold and off white silks. I am up to the surround now.  I had originally planned to stitch lots of linear strips, patterns from my upcoming book, but as I alluded to before – I have been seized by Another Idea.  The small stitched area just getting underway next to the T of TRIFLES is the beginning.  I am going to make an interlocking and overlying mesh of gears of various sizes and configurations, each outlined in a heavier non-counted stitch, but filled in using the geometrics found in my Ensamplario Atlantio.  I’ll be using coordinating fall colors for these – a bit of the brown and gold from the alphabet, but also cranberry, silver, and possibly a deep green.  The total effect should be rather Steampunk, and a lot of fun.

However as much fun as this piece is, necessity intrudes.  A friend of mine is welcoming a baby come the turn of the year.  She’s expressed a fondness for traditional baby colors, so I am knitting up a small baby blanket for her.  It will be car-seat and basket sized, not crib or reception size, so it is going quite quickly.

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I’m using Encore Colorspun worsted, an acrylic/wool mix for maximum washability, this being a baby blanket and all.  I’m knitting it on US 10.5 (6.5mm), which is relatively large for worsted in order to bring out the lacy stitch pattern.  The stitch pattern itself is adapted from an 18-stitch-wide strip pattern appearing in Knitted Lace Patterns of Christine Duchrow, Volume I.  I’ve chosen the narrow strip so that the gradual color changes pool, rather than speckling across the rows.  I’ve also chosen to work the stripes horizontally because I only have four balls of this yarn.  If I had run the piece the long way I might have risked running out before I reached a useful width.  By fixing my width, I can keep going until I have just enough to do an edging, or I can find a coordinating pink or off-white Encore for the edging, if there isn’t enough of the graded color yarn.  And finally, being a lazy person and not wanting to sew the strips together, I am using the long-loop join method I learned while working Fania Letouchnaya’s Forest Path Stole to knit the strips together as I march along.

Oh, and yes – those are massively long DPNs – about 12 inches long.  I really like extra long DPNs for hats and sleeves, and generally don’t use circulars for anything less than 20 or so inches around.  As a result I’ve got a collection of these admittedly unusual needles.

SOME MORE SAMOSA

The Samosa Vest is marching along quite nicely.  I’ve done it entirely ad hoc – no advance planning, no writing anything down (which is refreshingly liberating, for a change).  It’s been sort of sculptural, with problems worked out on the fly.  Still – there weren’t many.  Here are the front and back views:

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You can see that I’ve finished the body strips, wrapping the three primary ones around the front.  I did some minor shaping on the fourth, to add a bit of of a bust dart to the general shape.  Then I filled in two little patches under each arm.  After that the front was substantively done.  The next step was to pick up and knit the next strip, which outlined the upper back.  I continued on from there, until the space in the center became too small for two mitered corners.  At that point, I winged it – filling in the center back with a smaller shape, partially contoured with short rows, and a center-back join.  The result is rather like a racer back, and is quite flattering on Younger Daughter (modeled pix when done). 

I grafted off or picked up and knit the shoulders.  Finally I worked an i-cord edging around the entire outer edge to give the body a bit more firmness, and for a more professional finish.  It’s much nicer than the flabby chain selvedge edge that was there before.

Now I’ve got one last problem – there’s a Romulan (or Fire Kingdom) point at the top of each armhole.  I picked out one side and re-knitted it, but the point remains.  Time for some more noodling on possible fixes.  Once I’ve got that repair done, it’s i-cord around the armhole edges, and I’m finished.

Suggestions for possible fixes would be most graciously accepted!

SAMOSA VEST PROGRESS

As you can see, I’m making quick progress on my Samosa Vest.  Right now it’s just a single confusing strip of garter stitch knitting, with a couple of mitered corners and some angles thrown in.  But when you pat it into shape, the concept emerges:

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Ignoring the confusing letters for the moment, you can see the basic outline – the vee-neck, and the bottom edge that defines the width of the finished piece.

I cast on 13 stitches at A.  I knit a garter diagonal band, increasing on one side of the strip and decreasing on the other every other row to achieve the angle.  When my neckline was deep enough (B), I switched to working straight – a plain old 13-stitch strip until I was about 2 inches shy of my desired length.  Then I worked a wrapped short-row miter, making the corner at C.  I then knit across the bottom edge of the front, across the entire back (unseen, from D to E), then back across the front to the center point.  Again, about two inches shy of the center point, I did another miter (F).  After that I worked straight up to point G.  I reversed the shaping of my initial angled strip to create its mirror image, from G to H. 

Then exactly as I did in my Motley blanket, I cast off 12 stitches, added 12 and proceeded to work the second strip, knitting it onto the established edge strip as I went along.  I worked miters again at points K and N.  You can see I’m past O, headed back up to the shoulder where I initially cast on.

I will continue in this manner for one more strip.  That will make the shoulders of the piece about as wide as the shoulders of the target tee-shirt I am using as my size model.  At that point I’ll have to figure out how to fill in extra bits on the sides and in the center of the back.  But so far the thing has come together exactly as I envisioned.  And quickly, too!

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