REAL HIPSTER SOCKS

Well not, actually.  Just socks that feature hips:

Doc-sox-2a hip

These are the socks I mentioned in my last post, bespoke by the Resident Male as a gift for his hip replacement surgeon.  A frenzied week of knitting, to be sure, in order to be ready to be given at the scheduled follow-up appointment. 

I will say that both TRM and the socks have knit up well. Thanks to all for the get well wishes. He’s hobbling around quite spryly with cane, and gains movement range and strength every day.

On the socks, as previously posited, I worked them on two circular needles, in the round on 80 stitches around (US #00s) with figure-8 toe and short rowed heels.  I kept on that way until just after the completion of the heels, then splitting them at the center back, adding a stitch to the new left and right edges for later ease in seaming, and then continuing to work side by side, but this time, flat.

Here’s a typical late-night, poorly lit shot of the pair, side by side, being worked flat on a single circ, which I remembered to take at last minute:

doc-sox-1a

All in all, while I was happy to fulfill the special request, and interested in the experiment of working a pair on two circs with an Intarsia clock, I have mixed feelings about this project.

  1. If I had more time, the socks would be about an inch longer before the ribbing.  The proportion would be better.
  2. I still am not a fan of Intarsia.  That’s my mother’s favorite style of knitting.  I vastly prefer textures, lace and stranding.  Taming the multiple bobbins or yarn butterflies drive me crazy, no matter how careful I am at always using the strands in the right order and orientation.
  3. I should have used proportional graph paper rather than plain 1:1 squares when I charted the hip.  The stitch height:width ratio has flattened the design somewhat, and has lost some of the more gracefully round curvy details.  Here’s a place to make printable graph paper in any proportional ratio you need.
  4. I have and will probably use two-circs again for larger things like sleeves, but I don’t like that method for socks.  Not one bit.  Stopping to assort the needles and yarn slows me down big time over plain old DPNs.  I know others adore the method, but it’s not for me.

On the up side, the socks are complete.  They are the right size (I aimed at a guessed shoe size of men’s US 12-13, for a 6-foot guy), and although just a tad short from heel to ribbing, are totally wearable.  The motif sits well in place, and the copious end-darning doesn’t create uncomfortable ridges inside.  The mattress stitch seam worked perfectly, and the result is invisible from the outside of the work. 

Now on to other projects!

3 responses

  1. That’s a really clever design – and many thanks to the link to the graph paper site. I’m encouraged by your preference for dpns because all the experienced knitters in my knitting groups prefer circulars. I find circulars are great for flat knitting with heaps of stitches but I’m much more comfortable with dpns for knitting in the round.

  2. Anne C. in Bethesda, MD | Reply

    Nicely done! I once made a “hybrid” pair of socks like this, legs worked flat and then mattress-stitched. Grandson #5 wanted blue socks with red cables on the sides of the legs, seaming seemed the most enjoyable way to do it, and it worked fine (I didn’t do the TAAT on circular method, though). I’m with you, I much prefer dpns, especially the shorter Karbonz that I’ve taken to using for socks and gloves or mittens.

    Here’s to a complete recovery of TRM. Doing all the PT is the key!

  3. Mary K. in Rockport | Reply

    My husband will never see this post unless I show it to him, and I think I won’t because he’d want these socks (THREE replacements, so far!) and he has awfully big feet.

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