A CURIOUS APPLIQUE TECHNIQUE

I’ve long been been fascinated by one type of pattern that shows up in a couple of modelbooks. It’s a strip design, done positive/negative, such that cutting down the center line would yield double yardage of the repeating motif.

Here are some examples, quoted from Kathryn Goodwyn’s redacted editions of Giovanni Ostaus, La Ver Perfettione del Disegno, from 1561 and 1567.

I have tried to use this technique myself, with very unsatisfying results due to the stretchy nature of the unsuitable fabric I was using, lack of sufficient stabilizer, and imprecise cutting.

But I’ve finally found a historical example, and it’s pretty close to one of the Ostaeus 1561 designs – amusingly enough, the exact one I tried and failed so badly to use.

CH-Band

The full citation for this piece is

Band, 17th century; silk, metallic thread; Bequest of Marian Hague; Cooper Hewitt, Accession 1971-50-47.

Compare it to this from the 1561 edition of Ostaeus (p.36 in this redacted edition):

ostaeus-2

As to technique on the CH band – it works just as I envisioned.  This is velvet, carefully cut and appliqued to a ground, with the cut edges covered by a couched heavy metallic thread.  You have to admire the efficiency of this method; not a scrap of that green fabric was wasted.

So.  Has anyone seen other examples?  Has anyone attempted the technique, either in fabric as shown here or (probably easier) glovers’ type very thin real or faux leather?

2 responses

  1. I had a strip of gilt on brown leather for many years that was very close to this pattern. The person who did it (whose name I cannot recall after 30 years….) was a merchant at my first Egil’s and told me that it was done so that nothing was wasted.

  2. Not exactly the same, but check out some of the work of Alabama Chanin. Knit appliqued over knit and then cut out. No stabilizer.

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