OCTOBER ISN’T ALL THAT FAR OFF

So for those of you who favor seasonal stitchery, here is a suitably spooky present:

The inspiration for Baba Yaga is courtesy of my pal and former co-worker Laura Packer. Laura is a storyteller by trade – an unusual occupation these days, but one she does splendidly. You can sign up for notification of her public tellings at the link above, or you can subscribe for all sorts of creative goodness at her Paetron link.

Laura had sent a much appreciated surprise to me, so I doodled up the main Baba Yaga chicken-leg hut motif in return. She swooned over it, and suggested further additions from the story cycle – the chest with the egg/heart; the fence of bones (I stole my bony boi’s faces for that), the moon, three keys, a cauldron, a forest of briers, wind, a raven; and keys, creepy crawlies and other things in sets of three. I put in as many as I could, adding the motto across the bottom and the dreamer frame (in silhouette, intended to be stitched very densely for added mystery).

When we were both happy, I went final with it. And gave full rights to the design in perpetuity to Laura. She returned the favor by allowing me to post it here.

Please note that this is just a chart – not a full project described in detail. I suggest work in one or two colors on even weave or one of the higher count Aida fabrics, but I do not give thread consumption estimates. Linear elements can be done in double running or back stitch. The silhouette frame can be worked in long armed cross stitch, four sided cross stitch, or plain old cross stitch – your choice. There are gaps in places between the solid dark areas of the silhouette frame and its outline. Feel free to fudge those in with partial stitches if you like. I didn’t want to add visual complication by including the partials. It’s going to be hard enough to count as it is.

I don’t even have an as-stitched example to post (yet). If you beat me to that and feel so inclined, please send a photo and I will showcase it here.

You can download Baba Yaga from my embroidery pattern page (tab above or click here). While I am not charging for the thing, I do release it as “good deed ware.” Subscribe to Laura’s channel, or make a donation/buy a thing/otherwise subsidize the creative professional of your choice.

Artists – and especially face to face performance artists, actors, and musicians – are having a very hard time of it right now. But it’s art that keeps us anchored and sane in times of stress. If you can, please be a true patron and lend a hand. After all, doing good for those touched by the the spirits of creativity can only bring good fortune in return. Often in very unexpected ways. Let me tell you a story…

5 responses

  1. Absolutely brilliant! If you like Baba Yaga stories, try Orson Scott Card’s wonderful book, Enchantment. It is one of my all-time favorites. It is a real departure from his biblically inspired and Sci-fi works.

  2. I love the Baba Yaga. It’s in my queue! Is the bird a fire bird? And the cottage roof -is that a twig thatch? And finally – as well as the three acorns -you have three smaller winged seeds I think – what are they – doesn’t ring a bell in my admittedly imperfect recollection of the story.
    I’m having fun playing with color ideas right now. Hand dyed fabric already ordered.
    Now to hurry up and finish the dancing skeletons!
    Thank you.

    1. The bird is a raven, specifically requested by Laura. It is supposed to be a thatched roof, as best as can be rendered considering the limited play for detail at this space. The three smaller things are intended to be little bugs, perhaps midges. Laura specified creepy crawlies in sets of three.

      1. Thank you. That tells me the color ranges that I need to think about. It will be awhile before my cloth arrives.

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