Tag Archives: design

RISING SUN DESIGN CHALLENGE

I’m working along happily on my grapes wine-opening placemat, using the motif I redacted from the 17th century Hermitage artifact.

One big problem with my graphing of the design is that the original doesn’t stick to count on the placement of the individual large and small motifs. While each motif is worked true to count, their scattering across the piece is a series of eyeballed guesses, with no two offset by the same spacing. Here are a couple of enlarged snippets from the museum original that showcase the variance:

However, when I graph up a design I try to “regularize” it – often averaging the deviations among many repeats to create an easy to replicate canonical version of the design. In T2CM I note the degree to which I normed the repeat in each redacted design, so those who are interested in total veracity know that I’ve done a bit of tinkering, and can refer back to the original and determine if that level of deviation complies with their intent.

I played with the two main elements of this all-over repeat until I hit upon something that was regular and that accommodated the use of the smaller motif both as the “pinwheel” spinning off the larger grape/floral motif, and to occupy the center of the circle formed by the grape/florals. And I began stitching.

Now the placement I ended up using does have a flaw. The march of the grape/florals is offset one unit each iteration by the pinwheeling. That means that in the sample above, the right-most grape/floral presents one unit ABOVE the line established by the one immediately to its left. This is the problem that the original stitcher tried (with limited success) to combat by eyeballing placement rather than sticking to the count. Even with their best effort, the original artifact’s overall design does migrate a bit in the same way, like a time lapse photo of a rising sun, each pattern repeat appears ever so slightly above the one to its left.

This isn’t much of a problem for a large field design with no edges that matter, but for a smaller work the migration does become evident. Especially if an edging or hard border is used.

And I want to use a hard border. I’ve designed a companion border for this field, to be worked in the same color as the rest of the piece. Or I should say I’m still in the process of designing one because I haven’t settled on exactly the **right thing** yet. But this is getting close. I’m using the cinched rope visual trope contemporary with the field design, and incorporating elements of the grape/floral with it.

Yes, it’s blurry. It’s not ready for prime time yet, but you can squint and make out the basics – the rope, the pendant flowers borrowed from the field, and the line above running parallel to the rope. That line will save me, and whatever variant of this edging I end up using will include it. I will work the edging in strips, butting the corners instead of mitering them (a very historically accurate way of dealing with pesky corners), doing it in the neighborhood of the basted black guideline threads. Then I will work the field pattern up to and touching the edge line.

The rising sun anomaly will still be there, but the piece as a whole should be both bound and defined by the border. Or so I hope. Stay tuned! It’s going to be a while before I get to actually stitching that part. All the more time to refine my edging graph. 🙂

FINAL FUDGING

I’m pretty far along with the tablecloth now, having completed the center panels, and most of the edging top and bottom.  Now time to plan out the edging on the two narrow ends, left and right.

20190410_075321

Being a bungee-jump stitcher, when I improvised the companion edging I did not bother to consider how wide it would have to be to repeat evenly across.  I just went for it, figuring that because I started at the center, each corner would end more or less in the same place.

And when I got to the corners, lo and behold!  They are spot on.  Here are the three that are done, the other one is still in the frame.

Perfect alignment.

So I’ve taken my border, looked at what’s been stitched, aligned the center of the border with the center of the main motif (and adjusted because the center in this case is a block unit, not a single stitch), and doodled up a juncture.

corner

I’ve taken some liberties, joining the main motif to the side border – not a historically accurate practice – but since I am not making a historically accurate reproduction, why not?  Also note the center.  I’ve elongated the wrapped scepter motif used elsewhere in both the main and companion designs.  We will see if I like it when it’s stitched up.

What’s after this?

I’m still thinking of adding secondary smaller medallions at either end of the cloth, in red.  Another design, probably, but I have to either find or think one up that plays well with the established stitching.

TABLECLOTH PROGRESS, FORWARD AND BACK

On to the tablecloth!

Here’s one full repeat of the pattern I am using for the main lozenge in the center.  It’s one of the largest I’ve found.  Not the longest – several of the narrower strips beat it there, but certainly with length and width taken together the one with the largest area north/south plus east/west.

2019-03-05 22.02.26 (1)

I am in the process of adding another panel of the main design (the section between the “ice cream cones”) left and right of what you see here.  Possibly two.  We’ll see how I feel about proportions after I’ve finished the initial center set.

And I decided to draft my own companion border for this panel, after looking through and discarding others in my collections.  While coordinating borders are less common compared to ones that have absolutely no relation to the design elements in the main panel accompanied, they do exist.  Here’s an example (Metropolitan Museum of Art, Accession 79.1.14):

MMoA-79.1.14

I doodled up a couple of possibilities.  One didn’t make it off the drawing board.  The second I was more pleased with, and began trying it out:

snippet-10

20190309_124912

But once it began to make the transition from paper to stitching, I decided I didn’t like the way it was turning out.  It’s too tight, dark, and linear.  Plus I don’t like the proportions against the main pattern.

So I will pick out this little bit of companion border, and go back to the drawing board.  The goal is something lighter, looser, with more white space.  And wider – probably twice the width of what I had doodled up before.

%d bloggers like this: